Do I REALLY need to register my copyright?

Many artists and creative product producers are aware that ownership of a copyright occurs automatically when an author of an original work places that work into a tangible medium of expression. Because this happens automatically, many feel that taking the extra step of registering their copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office is an unnecessary extra step. Regarding ownership, this is true. There is no need for an author of an original work to register the work in order to own the copyright in the work.

The issue changes, however, when an author desires to enforce his or her rights against a third party. In order to properly file a lawsuit to enforce a copyright, the filer must have at least first filed to register the work with the U.S. Copyright Office. Some federal jurisdictions even require that the work be registered before suit can properly be filed.

Perhaps the most important reason to register a copyright in a work is to be able to benefit from the statutory damages provisions of the U.S. Copyright Act. If a work is properly registered before infringing acts occur, the owner of a work can elect statutory damages instead of having to prove actual damages. This can save a tremendous amount of money in litigation. Statutory damages can range as high as $150,000 per registered work if the infringement is shown to be intentional.

It is tempting to think, “I’ll register my work if and when someone infringes it.” But this plan won’t afford you the benefit of statutory damages. In order to be able to benefit from the option of statutory damages, a work must be registered before infringing acts occur, or at least before knowledge of those acts occurs. So the idea of waiting won’t work. The drafters of the statute purposefully included this caveat to attempt to encourage authors to go ahead and register their original works of authorship. So, do you really need to register your copyright? If you want to benefit from the statutory damages provisions of the U.S. Copyright Statute, the answer is “yes”.